“Life is short. Focus on what matters and let go of what doesn’t.” ~Unknown

What Do You Value Most In Your Life And What’s Import To You

The most important things in life are not things you can buy; yes they help life to be enjoyable whether it be a nice car, comfortable home, designer clothes.

We can these items as an when we have the money, they are disposable.

For me the most important things in life should be about:

  • Our purpose
  • Time
  • Health,
  • Our relationships

How I Came to This Conclusion

The ability to see things as they are and not as you ‘think’ they are is one of the most important things you will learn in your life.

Most people don’t have this ability.

They think they do, but they don’t.

We often talk about our priorities in life.

But how many of us have ever stopped to really think about which things are most important to us, let alone how much time we spend on our priorities compared to less important things?

So, “How Do You Determine Your Life And What’s Import To You”

Take a moment and imagine that you’re at the end of your life, how would you sum it up?

You also have the chance to give your current self some advice.

Think on this

No matter how much wealth we manage to accumulate in this world, it is virtually useless without good health.

Deep down, we all know that we only have a handful of decades on Earth and then it’s over.

In light of that, what becomes important then? That is indeed an interesting question. What is important cannot be money, because we can’t take it with us when we die.

What is important can’t be our possessions because, once again, they are not going with us. Having money and possessions is very temporary. Those things cease to matter to us when we die.

Some turn to their relationships when they realize this. They feel that family and friends must be the most important thing then. Yet, we will lose contact with family and friends when we pass away too.

Some people die and then come back. They call this the near-death experience.

Many of those people talk about what they saw in the state of death. They also talk about how they feel which is almost universally wonderful.

There are a few that report going to a very bad place, but the majority feel good. They are free from the pain and suffering of their mortal bodies.

In the near-death experience, many talk about the life review process, where they see their entire lives displayed before them.

The good things they do and the bad are right there. In addition, they see how their actions and words affected others too. Apparently, it can be quite painful to recognize how much we hurt others and caused others pain.

They also get to see the good things they did. I remember one woman who went through the life review process said that the most significant act in her entire life occurred when she was a little girl.

She said that the most important action out of her entire life was holding a little flower in her hand and giving it unconditional love. That was it, out of her entire life that was deemed the most significant thing she ever did.

In light of that, we can conclude that what is important is not who we were but how well we treated others in this life. Therefore, when we contemplate our lives and set our goals, maybe it would be a good idea if we thought about others first.

Life is not temporary, but life on Earth is temporary. How are we going to face all those people who are watching what we do, when it is all over? Hopefully, we will have done things that we can be joyous about

What would you say?

Many people find themselves saying things like “spend more time on the things that really matter, like family, finding real love, sharing making a difference.

The most important thing in life underpins everything you do

But how often do we actually stop to think about which things in our lives really matter most?

Even if we are clear on our priorities, are we actually living in a way that is consistent with them right now?

This action is designed to help us think this through. Also, our priorities change as we go through life.

A friend of mine always used say- “You can guarantee two things in life- Change and Death”.

This is tied closely to the knowledge of our own mortality.

Deep down, we all know that we only have a handful of decades on Earth and then it’s over.

So, When Do We Realise The Most Important Things In Life?

When someone asked this question on Quora, this answer stood out.

A philosophy professor stood before his class with some items on the table in front of him.

When the class began, wordlessly he picked up a very large and empty mayonnaise jar and proceeded to fill it with rocks, about 2 inches in diameter.

He then asked the students if the jar was full. They agreed that it was. So the professor then picked up a box of pebbles and poured them into the jar.

He shook the jar lightly. The pebbles, of course, rolled into the open areas between the rocks. He then asked the students again if the jar was full.

They agreed it was. The professor picked up a box of sand and poured it into the jar. Of course, the sand filled up the remaining open areas of the jar.

He then asked once more if the jar was full. The students responded with a unanimous “Yes.”

“Now,” said the professor, “I want you to recognize that this jar represents your life.

The rocks are the important things – your family, your partner, your health, and your children – things that if everything else was lost and only they remained, your life would still be full.

The pebbles are the other things that matter – like your job, your house, your car. The sand is everything else, the small stuff.”

“If you put the sand into the jar first,” he continued, “there is no room for the pebbles or the rocks. The same goes for your life.

If you spend all your time and energy on the small stuff, you will never have room for the things that are important to you.

Pay attention to the things that are critical to your happiness. Play with your children.

Take your partner out dancing. There will always be time to go to work, clean the house, give a dinner party, or fix the disposal.”

“Take care of the rocks first – the things that really matter. Set your priorities. The rest is just sand.

How To Determine Your Life and Whats Important

I’ve thought long and hard, about this question over many years, buts it’s only been over the last twelve months that I have been able to nail it down as to what’s important to me and it goes like this.

 

The following are the things that are important to me and the time I spend thinking about them.  They’ve brought me peace, love, and excitement, and made me grateful that I’m alive.

Hopefully, they are your answers too.

Health

Health is life. Care for it as you would care for your new-born child.”

Health is the number one thing men should look after.

Men spend a huge amount time at work, which brings untold stress and anxiety.  We don’t exercise we all know that exercise is good for us but we find excuses to avoid doing it.

I have said before, it’s your choice on how you lead your life, but if we take our health for granted even if we have a poor lifestyle. Then it comes with a health warning.

Poor health will both reduce the time you have in this world and your capability to live the life you want to live.

Therefore, if we want to live for a long time with a mind and body that can take us where we want; we must take care of our health.

I’m not saying life can’t be good if we’re sick, disabled or have other health challenges. I’m saying that people would like to feel capable of living the way they value and to live for a long time. Health, consequently, is absolutely fundamental.

Unfortunately, most middle-aged men only realize the importance of health when it’s gone. That’s the great danger of having your head in the sand.

The good thing is that we’re capable of influencing our health and it’s easier than most people think.

Invest in your relationships

When talking about life we’re used to hearing ourselves and others say that the most important thing in life is family and friends. It’s hard to disagree and the evidence supporting this is overwhelming.

What’s not as well understood is how to invest in our relationships to make them flourish and grow.

The above is likely one of the reasons why we see so many people divorce, why the time we spend with our friends steadily declines as we age and why many of us spend more time in front of the TV or computer than we spend with our kids.

Personally, I don’t think these things happen because we want them to. They happen because we neglect the important things in life. We forget to talk to show feelings we take our partners for granted. The rot then sets in.

Recommended Read: The 5 Love Languages

I think they happen because we don’t allow ourselves the time to reflect on what really matters and consequently, we’re not fully aware of the impact small choices we make in our day-to-day lives have on our relationships.

In order to have good relationships, I believe we need to both spend a considerable amount of time with the people we love and be really present during that time.

Time Or The Lack of It.

We all have the same number of hours in our day. 24 hours!

We have one chance at life, this is no dress rehearsal.

Time is something that cannot be bought, we cannot exchange it. So be warned, make every day count.

Some of us are good with time management others are not so good.

Most men find excuses for not doing things, we are great at putting things off, while other men approach life in a relaxed and happy state but still get plenty done?

Though we all have responsibilities and obligations, this often comes down to choices.

Many of us make poor exchanges on our time on a daily basis. Each time we say yes to something, we are effectively saying no to something else. The problem is, we often say yes to too much. This is where a balance starts to tip.

Each time we say yes to something, we are effectively saying no to something else. The problem is, we often say yes to too much. This is where men tend to find the regular excuses for not doing things, the balance of life, lifestyle and work becomes unbalanced.

We rush from one meeting to the next, never really feeling like we’re truly present at any of them. We squeeze evermore into our working day, at the expense of others.

Time is a finite resource; once spent, it’s gone. We can’t get time back but we can be selective and intentional with the time we have.

Of course, reclaiming your time isn’t always this simple. Some of us are working several demanding jobs in order to pay the most basic of bills. Maybe we are bringing up a young family, caring for ageing parents, or perhaps looking for a loved one who has physical or mental health challenges.

Some of us are working demanding jobs in order to pay the most basic of bills. Maybe we are bringing up a young family, caring for ageing parents, or perhaps looking for a loved one who has physical or mental health challenges.

Finding time for anything in these scenarios can be especially tough. Even if we do have time, we feel a heavy sense of guilt if we spend it doing something for ourselves, because it seems selfish.

Even if we do have time, we feel a heavy sense of guilt if we spend it doing something for ourselves, because it seems selfish.

If we’re limited in this way, a good start is to find small pockets of time to invest in our passion projects, our hobbies, and ourselves. Five minutes here, half an hour there can add up over a period of time.

We need to remember to care for ourselves along the way.

We can do this without neglecting our responsibilities. In fact, the more we can look after our own well-being, the better equipped we are to be of service to others.

 

Another step that we can take is to try to change our situation.

Maybe we can work closer to home or look to simplify and reduce our bills, and perhaps even work a little less.

These are all tough and very real challenges some of us face, and I will not make light of them here. All any of us can do is look to make the very best of our situations and be grateful for what we have instead of focusing on what we don’t have. Sometimes we need a little outside support from others to help us along. Where there is a will, there can be away.

Purpose

The meaning of purpose is WHY. It drives our actions. It fuels our passion. It encompasses our work, our relationships, and our approach to living our lives. It wraps around everything we do. It means living our lives in an intentional way. It gives our lives a sharper focus.

Here’s a story about Bruce Lee which sets the stage for this little exercise. A master martial artist asked Bruce to teach him everything Bruce knew about martial arts. Bruce held up two cups, both filled with liquid. “The first cup,” said Bruce, “represents all of your knowledge about martial arts. The second cup represents all of my knowledge about martial arts. If you want to fill your cup with my knowledge, you must first empty your cup of your knowledge.”

Bruce held up two cups, both filled with liquid. “The first cup,” said Bruce, “represents all of your knowledge about martial arts. The second cup represents all of my knowledge about martial arts. If you want to fill your cup with my knowledge, you must first empty your cup of your knowledge.”

If you want to discover your true purpose in life, you must first empty your mind of all the false purposes you’ve been taught (including the idea that you may have no purpose at all).

So how to discover your purpose in life?

While there are many ways to do this, some of them fairly involved here is one of the simplest that anyone can do.

The more open you are to this process, and the more you expect it to work, the faster it will work for you.

But not being open to it or having doubts about it or thinking it’s an entirely idiotic and meaningless waste of time won’t prevent it from working as long as you stick with it — again, it will just take longer to converge.

Here’s what to do:

Take out a blank sheet of paper or open up a word processor where you can type (I prefer the latter because it’s faster).

Write at the top, “What is my true purpose in life?”

Write an answer (any answer) that pops into your head. It doesn’t have to be a complete sentence. A short phrase is fine.

Repeat step 3 until you write the answer that makes you cry. This is your purpose.

That’s it.

It doesn’t matter who you are or what occupation you have rich or poor, to some people this exercise will make perfect sense. To others, it will seem utterly stupid.

Usually it takes 15-20 minutes to clear your head of all the clutter and the social conditioning about what you think your purpose in life is. The false answers will come from your mind and your memories. But when the true answer finally arrives, it will feel like it’s coming to you from a different source entirely.

But when the true answer finally arrives, it will feel like it’s coming to you from a different source entirely.